March 14, Wednesday, a number of schools across the country plan to allow their students to 'march' against gun violence, reportedly spurred on by the Stoneman Douglas tragedy in Florida.

However, a counter-movement has sprung up, one that appears to have far more lasting and positive impact. No disrespect to the marching students, but the vast majority don't fully comprehend the big picture.

What exactly are they marching for? Yes, to prevent school violence, or gun violence. But exactly what does marching or walking accomplish? Yes, it calls attention to the issue. But it doesn't do anything to curb it. In fact, many of these marches have been initially seeded by anti 2nd Amendment groups, hiding in the backround.

The National Walk Up Movement #WalkUp has spread on Facebook. Instead of marching for a few minutes, students are encouraged to engage in proactive behavior. The Walk Up movement challenges students to walk up to someone who sits along at lunch, and engage them or talk to them. To Walk Up to someone they've had arguments with or disagree with and make the peace. To Walk Up to those who are often viewed as social outcasts by others in school, and let them know they've got a friend. To Walk Up and notice people who may be hurting or otherwise isolated or suffering.

By Walking Up and paying attention, students can also spot behaviors that could potentially be harmful on a student to themselves, but others, before it's too late.

It's no secret a significant number of school shootings have occurred because students have been shunned, bullied or otherwise made to feel like they're sub-human. That's not the ONLY cause, but it's significant.

Let's be blunt here. There will be students marching across the nation who have already, or the 'day after' will engage in or repeat  some sort of 'mistreatment' of others. Others are marching just because it's cool, or they want their 15 minutes of fame.

No , Walking Up is much HARDER than just marching. But in the long run, it will provide far greater benefits in preventing school violence and issues in general.

It takes courage, but it will make a difference.