Back in the days of the old west, suspected murderers were dealt with swiftly, and with a minimum of evidence. A dead body and a likely suspect were pretty much all that was necessary.

These days, you can't just round up a posse and jump on the trail after the bad guys. Besides, murderers in large populations don't usually leave an obvious trail.

In recent years, shows like Forensic Files and CSI have shown how the smallest fiber or the tiniest blood drop can point investigators in the right direction and end up solving near-impossible cases. The perfect murder is becoming a thing of the past.

In the TV series Dexter, blood spatter analysis came to the forefront for everybody's favorite serial killer (he only killed bad guys...mostly), not always in solving crimes, but in making sure you don't get caught.

Richland Police recently went through some very cool blood spatter training. This is important even for first responders so they don't contaminate a blood-stained scene as well as for those who will spend hours investigating and documenting the splatter patterns. A crime scene can often be completely recreated just by accurately analyzing every detail of blood spatter.

The 11 Deadliest Serial Killers in Washington State's Bloody History

Every state is known for something. Florida has swamps and beautiful weather, Iowa has wrestling and corn, New York has Manhattan and Brooklyn-style pizza, Maryland has crabcakes. Washington has apples, wine, IPAs, and serial killers. This article is not meant to glorify these evil people in any way, just shed some light on a bizarre Washington truth. From Bundy to the Green River Killer, these are eleven of the deadliest killers in Washington state history.

Texas' Housing Market Will Make You Want to Move Away From Tri-Cities

The housing market in Tri-Cities is insane. Forget just Kennewick, Pasco, and Richland! Even houses in Prosser and Benton City are going high! It's so crazy, my family members moving to Tri-Cities have been seriously downgrading. Take a look at my in-laws' home they sold in Texas. It has five bedrooms, three full bathrooms, two half bathrooms, it's over 4,000 square feet, PLUS it has an in-ground heated pool that's enclosed to keep the bugs out. How much would you pay for it? It sold for less than $450,000.

This house in Kennewick sold for more money, had half the square footage, NO pool, and had far fewer bedrooms and bathrooms. Do you get where I'm going with this? Let's take a look inside my in-laws' former home and cry over a bowl of Ben & Jerry's ice cream.