If you've been watching the Olympics on NBC,  then you've seen the trailers for the new NBC show coming this fall: "Stars Earn Stripes."

The pilot episode is set to air  Monday, Aug. 13. The premise is eight Hollywood stars and famous personalities battle each other in military-themed challenges for prize money that will go to charitable causes. Retired General Wesley Clark joins the host to oversee these events. Laila Ali, Peekaboo Street, Terry Crews,  Dean Cain, and even Sarah Palin's husband Todd join in the show.

From the official NBC website about the show:

"In this fast-paced competition, the eight celebrities will gather at a remote training facility where they will be challenged to execute complicated missions inspired by real military exercises. From helicopter drops into water to long-range weapons fire, the contestants will be tested physically, mentally and emotionally. Each will be paired with a special operative from a military branch or one of our first-responder forces, including former U.S. Army Delta Force and Green Berets, U.S. Navy SEALS, U.S. Marines and police officers, who train alongside their partners and compete in the missions with them. Each of the teams is competing for a cash prize on behalf of a military, veterans or first-responder charity."

While we admire the idea, and the premise, and the charitable goals, some critics are already saying the show trivializes the dangers our military men and women face. Sarah Kickler-Kelber of the Baltimore Sun wrote the ads alone were making her mental. The trailers claim the show will force the eight contestants to face "the same challenges" as our military personnel. Kelber blogs the following:

"The ad for 'Stars Earn Stripes' claims that celebrities will face 'the same challenges as our Armed Forces.' Oh, really? Insurgents going to be shooting or lobbing bombs at them? Improvised explosive devices possibly planted around every corner? Trying to manage family issues from thousands of miles away? Somehow, I don’t think so."

Kelber can speak from a position of authority; her husband spent a year in Afghanistan. She goes on to say she can't be the only one who thinks the show and its premise are inappropriate and overstated. 

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