Months ago, we heard and saw census-takers going door-to-door in our neighborhood, even though we had filled it out already and sent it in.

It's understandable, the population needs updating. But now, the Biden Administration wants to apply that practice to COVID vaccines.

During a briefing Tuesday, Biden announced the government wants to create a 'door knocking' campaign where workers would go house by house, through cities and neighborhoods. They would knock on doors and inquire about vaccination status and urge people to get one.

This comes as the U.S. still inches towards a 'goal' of having at least 70% of the population vaccinated.

Washington State still has not hit 70 percent either. Texas House Rep Dan Crenshaw reacted swiftly to Biden's idea, saying (according to Fox News):

"How about don’t knock on my door. You’re not my parents. You’re the government. Make the vaccine available, and let people be free to choose. Why is that concept so hard for the left?"

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Criticism and backlash were swift to this idea. It brought up the question, how would the government know if you had one or not? They would have to ask. That, say critics, medical experts and others in the medical community, is a private choice between a person and their doctor.

This has already been done in California, The Sacramento Bee reported in May that $10 million dollars were appropriated to support such efforts. Some 13 counties were 'targeted' by a group of 2,000 workers.

No word as to what if any resistance they met, according to state officials, they claim most were happy to see the vaccination reminder workers. But that comes from a state source.

No word if Inslee plans to copy Biden's idea and send people door-to-door.

 

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