We heard a few rumors a couple of days ago, but now GOP officials and legislators are trying to pull back the curtain.

Tracy Ellis, who is the Audio-Video Media Coordinator for the Washington State Senate Republicans, released information Tuesday that is shocking.

"L& I created these rules behind closed doors, in the dark, without any of the employer advocates even knowing it was coming..."

Senator Mark Schoessler (R-Ritzville) says legislators have learned that the Department of Labor and Industries has created a new set of rules that could potentially be used by the Governor to extend his vaccine mandate to private businesses.

According to Schoessler:

 "L& I created these rules behind closed doors, in the dark, without any of the employer advocates even knowing it was coming..."

He also said:

 "The rules are so vague, that you could just about extend it to anybody under any circumstances..."

Noted political follower and blogger Ari Hoffman was able to dig up some information on this story.  He reported in his work at The Post Millenial that Monday Labor and Industries filed last week what's called an "emergency package" extending the emergency powers of Gov. Inslee.

 WHAT DO THESE NEW RULES DO?

It also grants him, according to elected officials, the power to extend his vaccine mandate to all private businesses.  GOP House Reps Jim Walsh of Aberdeen and Jesse Young of Gig Harbor condemned the move by Labor and Industries, calling it a  "blank check" for the agency to enforce Inslee's edicts.

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Walsh, by the way, was locked out of his office in the House Rep Building in Olympia, allegedly for failing to provide proof of having gotten a COVID-19 vaccine.

 As of this writing, we are attempting to contact a media person at Labor and Industries, but so far we have been passed to other persons 3 times. 

To read Hoffman's story in The Post Millenial, which was share by GOP Senate officials click on the button below.

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