Why do so many serial killers originate in Washington?

Is it all the caffeine in the Puget Sound? Was it the influx of people moving to Washington during World War II? Whatever the cause may be (if there even is a cause), our beautiful state is plagued with a horrific fact - we have had a lot of serial killers.

Three of the most infamous serial killers in American history called Washington home for most of their lives. There are eight more on this list.

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True crime has always been a fascination of mine. What drives people to become murderers? What's the difference between a sociopath and a psychopath? Why were the 1970s and 80s so rampant with serial killings? I try not to obsess over it too much, but I know I'm not alone in this interest. I would like to clarify that I am not here to glorify murderers and sadistic monsters, merely to shed some light on a Washington state phenomenon. If you are sensitive to brutality and cruelty, please be advised that I try my best to write this story as tastefully as I can.

The 11 Deadliest Serial Killers in Washington State's Bloody History

Every state is known for something. Florida has swamps and beautiful weather, Iowa has wrestling and corn, New York has Manhattan and Brooklyn-style pizza, Maryland has crabcakes. Washington has apples, wine, IPAs, and serial killers. This article is not meant to glorify these evil people in any way, just shed some light on a bizarre Washington truth. From Bundy to the Green River Killer, these are the ten deadliest killers in Washington state history.

25 True Crime Locations: What Do They Look Like Today?

Below, find out where 25 of the most infamous crimes in history took place — and what the locations are used for today. (If they've been left standing.)

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.