The other day, some of the weather wizards were discussing a wind chill of 24 degrees in the Tri-Cities when the temp was around 31.

HOW DOES WIND CHILL WORK ANYWAY? WHY SO COLD?

It involves convection or the process by which heat is taken away from your body at the molecular level, by the wind.

In the summer, a nice breeze helps with the heat. But in winter, not so much. A bitter wind makes your nose feel like it's falling off your face.

As explained by college researchers at the University of Wisconsin (they oughta know...Green Bay!) here's what happens when it's cold and the wind blows.

 It involves convection or the process by which heat is taken away from your body at the molecular level, by the wind. 

According to the University of Wisconsin:

"The wind-chill accounts for the increased loss of heat by the movement of the air. The wind-chill, expressed in degrees, translates your body's heat losses under the current temperature and wind conditions, to the air temperature under calm conditions that would produce equivalent heat losses."

The faster the wind, and the more of your body exposed to the elements, the faster you have heat loss.  And that, my friends, is wind chill.  That explains why a breeze feels good in the summer because it helps cool your body down. But in the winter, it can be deadly.

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By the way, frostbite can set in as well.  What exactly is it? The definition? From U of Wisconsin, it kinda sounds gross:

"Frostbite occurs when your skin cools down below the freezing point. Frostbite usually occurs at your body's extremities, fingers, toes, and ears."

Wind chill can lead to frostbite.  So bundle up thick, and don't set on a metal bench at a football game without a pad or blanket. That metal bench will suck the heat right out of you and make your butt go numb.  It's part of the frostbite family effect.  That is a process called conduction...the transfer of heat molecules directly between two surfaces...oh never mind!

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