Initiative 1639, perhaps the most controversial (and many say unlawful) piece of anti-gun legislation to ever pass in Washington state, will NOT be enforced in Franklin County.

County Commissioners, led by newly elected Commissioner Clint Didier, have approved a resolution that will support Sheriff Jim Raymond who in November said he would not enforce the plan.

Raymond wrote a moratorium to county officials saying he had serious doubts it was legal, it violated 2nd Amendment rights, and he would not put his deputies in harm's way trying to enforce the controversial statutes.

The first part of the 'ban' went into effect, prohibiting those under 21 from buying certain types of rifle weapons. Supporters of the initiative call them 'assault weapons' but since there's no official legal definition of what that is until July, local gun stores have been using this loophole to sell them like hotcakes to those 18-21.

The second part this summer will include longer backround checks and more intrusive inquiries for those seeking to buy a gun, new storeage rules and long waiting periods.

Sheriff Raymond will not participate in enforcing the storage rules or other new parts of the initiative, saying they could potentially be too dangerous.

County Commissioners agree, although Commissioner Brad Peck says it could place the county in a liability position that could result in a wrongful death suit against county if certain actions were to take place regarding use of a gun. Nonetheless, the county is on board with the Sheriff.