We will get some snow, then bitter cold weather (Townsquare Media)
We will get some snow, then bitter cold weather (Townsquare Media)
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Not likely Christmas Day will see any snow.  There might be some rest of the weekend, but starting Sunday night, the temps are dropping fast for the Tri-Cities, Southeastern WA and Northeastern Oregon.

TEMPS WILL PLUMMET WELL BELOW FREEZING WITH WIND

From NOAA and the National Weather Service:

"Sunday Night
A 20 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 19.

Monday
Partly sunny, with a high near 22.
Monday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 13.
Tuesday
A slight chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 19.
Tuesday Night
A slight chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 9.
Wednesday
Partly sunny, with a high near 15."
   An Arctic air mass is bulging down from Canada, so we will be getting their weather. These temps are expected to last into the beginning of the New Year. Here's the actual warning from the NWS, so Bundle UP!
DANGEROUSLY COLD TEMPERATURES EXPECTED NEXT WEEK...

An arctic air mass is expected to bring significantly colder
temperatures beginning early next week and continuing into the the
New Year. Multiple days of high temperatures below freezing with
overnight lows into the single digits and below are forecast. Wind
chills below zero will be possible.

With this extreme cold, frost bite and hypothermia will occur
much faster. If traveling, remember to dress in layers and cover
exposed skin. Uncovered pipes will be susceptible to freezing and
bursting.

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