It's no secret Gov. Jay Inslee wants to be known as the 'greenest' governor in U.S. history.  Tuesday, he unveiled his plan to once again push for a carbon tax that would likely affect producers and importers of electricity, natural gas and petroleum. What is NOT clear is whether you and I would be taxed for the emissions we generate.

Inslee's efforts have been thwarted so far by what was known as The Coalition, a group of 23 GOP and 2 Democratic Senators who've shot down his proposals. But due to one hotly contested Senate race near Seattle in the 45th District, Democrats how have a one-seat majority, while controlling the state House.

Inslee's plan contains two 'interesting' ideas:

"The governor proposes placing a tax on carbon pollution
associated with the production and consumption of
fossil fuels in Washington state. Emissions generated
by transportation fuels and electrical generating units
and through natural gas consumption would be taxed
beginning at $25 a ton as of May 1, 2018. The rate
of taxation increases annually by 3.5 percent, plus
inflation."
 The key phrase here is the "emissions generated by transportation fuels and electrical generating units." Does that mean we will be taxed for driving or heating our homes? The plan is not clear.
   The other part reads as follows:
"The tax on fossil fuels applies to sellers and
users. It is levied on the first possession, meaning
that it would be imposed on any company that
generates or imports electricity, natural gas or
petroleum."
  One could read into this that those who provide energy and fuel to citizens, companies and businesses would be taxed, thereby likely being forced to pass on those costs to consumers.
     Inslee wants to dip into the state's reserves to fully fund education, more fallout from the controversial McCleary Decision, and then use the carbon tax to refill the coffers. Critics say aside from replacing the education money, most of the revenue generated by the carbon tax would be lost in a 'black hole' of waste and useless spending.
  They point to the billions lost by the Obama Administration due to the Stimulus that saw money dumped into hundreds of green energy companies, most which later went bankrupt. Of the well over 100 such firms nationally, Solyndra was the biggest, losing thousands of jobs in California.