Apparently, the Department of Health thinks it's as easy as a bus pass?

So, would you trust your vaccination data to a QR Code reader? Take our Poll.

Gov. Inslee on Friday, Nov. 12 tweaked one of his proclamations to the indoor vax proof mandate by adding the QR code from the Department of Health.

 QR CODES ARE SIMILAR TO BAR CODES

A QR looks like this, as opposed to a bar code.

Getty Images

 

Both accomplish the same basic task, although a QR code can store a lot more information than a standard store product bar code.

The Washington State Department of Health through waverify.doh.wa.gov has a way to get a QR code on your phone that can be shown to be used as proof of vaccination status. You have to fill out some information online, and get a PIN etc. and it reportedly will work.

There are some security issues linked to QR codes, according to various sources, including this from AZCentral.com in their business news section:

"Unless you know and trust the source, following the link generated by the QR code can lead to a malicious landing page or a sophisticated scam. They've been used in targeted phishing scams because the fake sites they take visitors to can look just like a legitimate site of a trusted company."

Now that does apply to you doing the scanning FROM your phone to a QR code, not necessarily the other way around. But while the QR tech itself cannot really be hacked, the destination where it will TAKE you can be a malicious site.

  So, would you trust your vaccination data to a QR Code reader? Take our Poll.

 

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.